geek style

Wookiee Wednesday: DIY Your Own Tacky Ewok Christmas Sweater

It’s the day before Christmas Eve and you want to wear something super amazing for any upcoming festivities, but what? Here’s an idea: make your own tacky holiday sweater! Grab an old blank sweater that you don’t really wear anymore and head to the craft store to get some supplies.

You can put whatever you want on it, but for mine I made an ewok with a Christmas twist. Go figure. If you go along with the following instructions for when you do your sweater, you’ll be good to go whether you make a wampa, a tauntaun, or even a snowman. 🙂

Materials needed:

not pictured: printer paper, marker, pencil, iron, ironing board
  • Blank sweater (whatever color you desire)
  • Felt (in any color you need for your design)
  • Buttons
  • Infusible Web
  • Scratch paper
  • Writing utensil (marker/pencil)
  • Embroidery thread that matches your felt
  • Needle — preferably one with a big eyehole if you’re using embroidery floss.

* pro-tip: Ditch the embroidery thread and needle if you have a sewing machine and aren’t lazy like me.

Step 1: When you figure out what you want your design to be, sketch it onto a piece of paper. I prefer to use printer paper because it’s already a good size for your sweater.

After I sketched my design, I went over it with a black marker.

If you’d prefer to have a template than make one yourself, you can always search the Internet for a stencil of something you might like. But pick something that’s easy to trace, otherwise you’re gonna have some major craft rage.

Step 2: Cut out your templates, place them on top of your felt pieces (you can use sewing pins or tape to secure them onto the felt), and cut along the template.

I cut the ears off and placed them on my tan felt.

Step 3: Once you’ve cut all the shapes you need, place them all on the infusible web. Make sure you put the wrong side down on the sticky side.

Iron on the infusible wed with the tracing paper it comes with on top. That way you won’t risk burning your felt (which I have done before)!

Trim the excess infusible web and peel off the paper from the back.

Step 4: Place a sturdy surface inside your sweater (I used cardboard), put your felt pieces in position on your sweater and begin to iron it on.

Step 5: Place any embellishments you might have onto your design. For mine, I just used brown buttons for the ewok’s eyes and red buttons for the holly berries.

Step 6: If you have a sewing machine and aren’t lazy to whip it out, sew around the edges of your design to clean it up and also to ensure that your design stays on your sweater.

I mainly focused on stitching around the hood of the ewok and its ears.

OR, stitch along the edges with embroidery floss. This can be tedious, so take your time and start a Netflix binge so you’ll have something to distract yourself from wanting to throw your project onto the ground in defeat. Hey, this sometimes happens when crafting. 😛

Ta-da! I got a hand cramp while working on the face, hence a no-mouth ewok. I still think it’s cute 😀

Once you’re done with that step, you’re ready to go ewokin’ in a winter wonderland with your brand new sweater! But if you want to up the ante on the tacky factor, you can add all kinds of bells and whistles to your sweater — both literally and figuratively. 🙂

cheers

7 thoughts on “Wookiee Wednesday: DIY Your Own Tacky Ewok Christmas Sweater

  1. I wasn’t originally paying attention to the post title because I was distracted by the sweater! I can’t believe you DIY’d that! Its super rad. Gonna have to try that on a sweater I have that could use some DIY love! Merry Christmas!

    Like

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